Response for project 200001400: Evaluate Lamprey Habitat/Popul

Comment on proposed FY 2006 budget

The budget of $204,465 is consistent with Bonneville's approved budget and is what we request for FY 2006. We understand that, in FY 2006 the budget does not allow for increases associated with the cost of inflation or increasing personnel costs. As a result of this, it may be necessary for us to adjust the work statement accordingly.

Accomplishments since the last review

Produce Environmental Compliance DocumentationEnsured that environmental compliance requirements were met.
Coordination Worked collaboratively with WDFW on design, implementation, and management implications.
Manage and Administer ProjectsConducted project contract administration with BPA.
Provide Technical ReviewParticipated with Columbia River Lamprey Technical Workgroup.
Produce Annual ReportProduced 2003 and 2004 annual reports.
Produce Status ReportProduced all quarterly reports required since last provincial review.
Produce/Submit Scientific Findings ReportStone, J. and S. Barndt. 2005. Spatial Distribution and Habitat Use of Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) Ammocoetes in a Western Washington Stream. J. Freshwater Ecology 20(1):171-185.
Install Fish Trap/Monitoring WeirDuring both years since the last provincial review we have installed and operated an adult traps as well as a downstream migrant trap.
Develop RM&E Methods and DesignsDeveloped an experimental design and began to evaluate capture probabilities and sampling efficiencies for larval lamprey.
Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab DataConducted spawning ground surveys. Collected information on nest construction. Recorded adult movement into spawning areas. Evaluated spawning habitat requirements of adults. Evaulated larval distribution, habitat use, and biological characteristics.
Mark/Tag AnimalsPIT-tagged adult lamprey.
Disseminate Raw & Summary DataProvided data to support subbasin planning, Columbia River Lamprey Technical Workgroup activities, the multiagency Lamprey Summit, and to assist in the USFWS evaluation of the petition to list lamprey under the ESA.
Analyze/Interpret DataCalculated adult abundance and described behavioral and biological characteristics of adults. Calculated larval abundance and described behavioral and biological characteristics of adults. Estimated larval capture probabilities. Evaluated habitat use.

Work has been established in Cedar Creek, a tributary to the Lewis River (WA). Since relatively little is known about lamprey, some of the initial work focused on determining effective sampling methodologies and logistics. Baseline data has now been collected to begin understanding how to evaluate lamprey abundance and distribution as well as what the anundance and distribution is in Cedar Creek. All annual and quarterly reports have been submitted. While some of the initial data has been synthesized (see journal publicationmetric), to date some of this work has been focused on collecting preliminary data and data that be used in subsequent time series analyses.

FY 2006 goals and anticipated accomplishments

Produce Environmental Compliance DocumentationEnsure that environmental compliance requirements are met.
CoordinationWork collaboratively with WDFW on project design, implementation, and management implications.
Manage and Administer ProjectsConduct project contract administration with BPA.
Provide Technical ReviewParticipate with Columbia River Lamprey Technical Workgroup.
Produce Annual ReportProduce 2005 and 2006 annual reports.
Produce Status ReportProduce all quarterly reports required in 2005 and 2006.
Produce/Submit Scientific Findings ReportSubmit a manuscript - The influence capture probabilities on abundance and distribution estimation: larval lamprey.
Install Fish Trap/Monitoring WeirDuring 2005 and 2006, install and operate adult traps as well as a downstream migrant trap.
Develop RM&E Methods and DesignsModify the experimental design and continue to evaluate capture probabilities and sampling efficiencies for larval lamprey.
Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab DataConduct spawning ground surveys. Collect information on nest construction. Recorded adult movement into spawning areas. Evaluate spawning habitat requirements of adults. Evaulate larval distribution, habitat use, and biological characteristics.
Mark/Tag AnimalsPIT-tag adult lamprey.
Disseminate Raw & Summary DataProvide data to support subbasin plan implementation, Columbia River Lamprey Technical Workgroup activities and to assist in the USFWS if further evaluation lamprey status becomes necessary.
Analyze/Interpret DataCalculate adult abundance and describe behavioral and biological characteristics of adults. Calculate larval abundance and describe behavioral and biological characteristics of adults. Estimate larval capture probabilities. Evaluate habitat use.

In FY 2006, we anticipate that we will begin to sytnthesize the data collected during previous years and explore for trends and patterns. We should be able to better understand if and how adult lamprey abundance and distribution can be monitored. We should be able to better understand if and how larval lamprey abundance and distribution can be monitored.

Subbasin planning

How is this project consistent with subbasin plans?

Consistency: The project is consistent with and implements components of reports associated with Lower Columbia River Subbasin Plans. The Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery and Fish and Wildlife Subbasin Plan lists Pacific Lamprey as a significant species (Page 2-3). Relatively little is known about status of Pacific lamprey. Lamprey have been adversely effected by loss of habitat (Page 1-2), have experienced declining or variable trends in recent years and are an integral part of the Lower Columbia River ecosystem (Page 3-104). Most data suggests that populations have declined concurrent with hydroelectric development and other habitat changes (Page 2-18). Limiting factors are listed in Table 14 (Page 3-110 thru 111). The objectives for Pacific lamprey are to reverse the decreasing abundance trend and manage for populations that can meet cultural and ecological needs (Overview, Page 15; Page 5-46). The NF and EF Lewis River Subbasin Plan calls for improving habitat to help benefit declining lamprey populations (G-191). This plan also identifies a lack of data and little research on Pacific lamprey, both of which are considered necessary (see all of Appendix B, 16-1). The Lower Columbia and Columbia Estuary Bi-State Subbasin Plan also recognizes that Pacific lamprey are ecologically and culturally significant (Page 4-3). This plan calls for reducing predation on (PO4), limiting exposure to contaminants for (PO5), documenting ecological interactions of (PO6), documenting habitat use by (PO7 and PO11), avoiding dredging mortality of (PO10), protecting overexploitation of (PO12), restoring peak flows for (PO14), improving dam passage of (PO15) Pacific lamprey (Page ES-5 thru 6) and providing for a minimum of 100,000 adults passing Bonneville Dam annually (Page 4-32).

How do goals match subbasin plan priorities?

Priority: The project accomplishes priority work identified under the above referenced plans. In The Lower Columbia Salmon Recovery and Fish and Wildlife Subbasin Plan, the objective to reverse the decreasing abundance trend and manage for populations that can meet cultural and ecological needs will require substantial increases in our understanding of the species. At present, research needs include: determining adult swimming and migratory capabilities and the degree of spawning site fidelity; quantifying the level of predation on migrating adults; identifying spawning locations, habitat characteristics, and incubation survival; determining habitat requirements and duration of freshwater residency of juvenile lamprey in the subbasins, mainstem and estuary; and rectifying difficulties in abundance estimates because of repeated up and downstream movement (Recovery Goals, Page 5-46). In addition, OS.M7. calls for an evaluation and improvement of passage conditions at mainstem and tributary dams, ensuring no negative effects on salmonid passage; while OS.M8. calls for allocation of water within the annual water budget for the Columbia River Basin so that it simulates peak spring discharge (Strategies and Measures, Page 6-68). The identification of status, limiting factors, and management alternatives for lamprey is also a high priority (Monitoring and Research, Page 7-31). The NF and EF Lewis River Subbasin also identifies a lack of data and little research on Pacific lamprey, both of which are considered necessary (see all of Appendix B, 16-1). The Lower Columbia and Columbia Estuary Bi-State Subbasin Planstates that strategies and measures to return selected historic lamprey populations to viability are among the highest levels of importance. The goal for the Columbia River Pacific lamprey is to reverse the decreasing abundance trend and increase the population to a self-sustaining, viable population that can provide for cultural and ecological needs.

Other comments

The project is also consistent with and implements components of the 2000 Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) as well as the Columbia River Lamprey Technical Workgroup (TWG) report. The FWP has obtaining the information to begin restoring the characteristics of healthy lamprey populations as a Basin level biological objectives. The TWG has identified research on lamprey status, biology and ecology, population delineation, passage, population dynamics, limiting factors analysis, and restoration activities as necessary.